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Nourishing our gut with dietary fiber

Nourishing our gut with dietary fiber
Dietary Fiber is a combination of plant carbohydrates that are resistant to our digestion system, meaning the body cannot break them down. Carbohydrates are normally broken down into sugar molecules, but dietary fiber the body passes through is undigested as certain resistant starches and prebiotics play a role in feeding our gut bacteria. 
 
Our diet is a key environmental factor that helps the metabolic functions of the microbes in our gastrointestinal tract. Fiber and prebiotics play a positive role in these microbes. Diversity in our gut microbes is an important part of our health.
 
Across the globe, you will see various fiber intakes per day, based on location, lifestyle, and access to various foods. Studies show the greater the dietary fiber intake, the more diversified the gastrointestinal microbial community is.
 
In western society, diets lack an adequate amount of fiber per day. This low fiber intake correlates with diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular issues, type 2 diabetes, and colon cancer.
 
Fiber is found in plant nutrients, as it serves as the structural support in plants. Therefore, increasing your intake of plants in your diet increases your fiber intake.
 
Fibers can be found in food sources such as grains, oats, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes.
 
Fiber helps regulate blood sugar, enhance immune support, and improve glycemia and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic and diabetic individuals.  
 
There are two types of dietary fiber.
 
1.)   Soluble fiber
2.)   Insoluble fiber
 
Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and helps food move through your digestive system, promoting regular bowel movements and preventing constipation.
 
Insoluble fiber food sources are found in:
  • Legumes
  •   Leafy greens
  •   Rice
  •   Quinoa
  •   Fruit with edible skins, (for ex: apples, blueberries, pears)
  •   Nuts
  •   Seeds
  •   Grains
  •   Bananas
  • Potatoes
  • Plantains
  • Avocados
 
 
Soluble fiber dissolves in water and can be categorized even further into fermentable fibers which help to bulk our stool and act as prebiotics. Not all fibers can be classified as prebiotics. Fermentable fibers come from food sources such as onions, chicory root, asparagus, and artichokes. Prebiotics are needed for the growth of our intestinal bacteria.
 
Soluble fiber food sources are found in:
  •   Oats
  •   Chia Seeds
  •   Legumes
  •   Nuts
  •   Lentils
  •   Fruit with edible skins, (for ex: apples, blueberries, pears)
  •   Bananas
  • Plantains
  • Avocados
 
Soluble prebiotic food sources:
  •   Onions
  •   Chicory root
  •   Asparagus
  •   Artichokes
 
The USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest the following amounts of fiber per day in your diet based on age range and gender.
 
  •   Women under 50, 25 to 28 grams per day
  •   Men under 50, 31 to 34 grams per day
  •   Women 51 and older, 22 grams per day
  •   Men 51 and older, 28 grams per day
 
 
If you are someone who struggles with their daily fiber intake and needs something to help with regular bowel movement support. LOOK Organics has created a soluble fiber inulin powder derived from organic Jerusalem artichoke.
 
It is simple to add to your daily routine, by mixing 1 scoop of our powder into water or adding it to your smoothie.
 
Note: individuals with sensitivity to fibers adding in 1 full scoop might cause digestive stress with symptoms of bloating or upset stomach. Start with a small serving size and slowly work your way up to 1 scoop.
 
The dietary fiber and prebiotics you consume have a supportive role in the microorganisms that live symbolically within us!

Let’s start nurturing and diversifying our microbiome.


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